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Dishonored 2 - Review

Dishonored 2 - Review

                The first thing you notice about Dishonored 2 is of course its art style. With such a huge difference to the art styles of many other games it is easily the thing that makes Dishonored 2 seem so like Dishonored. The art style also makes the game varied from the other Bethesda made, or distributed games save for Wolfenstein which often look less than stellar at times. The art style though different than most modern games can admittedly also be a deterrent to many gamers.

                The story begins much like that of the first with the crown being overthrown quite quickly. In this game however the actual arc of the overthrow is a bit more ridiculous considering Corvo Attano, the main character of the first game and one of two in this game, should expect his beloved daughter to have threats to her crown much like her mother. Beyond this seemingly trivial point the story gets off to a great start. Then the big question of who you want to play as Emily or Corvo, in my play through I chose Corvo as I really felt a connection with that character in the first game. That said many people have argued, and to some point I agree that Emily’s play through makes sense in a more character way as we’ve already seen Corvo’s story so to speak.

                As for if that choice matters much beyond their different powers, honestly it seemed like it would greatly change how you played the game, but as for the actual story of the game the only points to change would be simple changes of small lines of dialogue. For the most part the story is very similar to the story of the first game, but with a smaller crew helping your character of choice push to overthrow Jessamine Kaldwin who has overthrown your empress Emily Kaldwin.

                Without characters beside you that have much interest in who you kill and how you go about it there is nothing stopping you from pushing straight to your own need to kill or push those out of the way that stand between you and reuniting with your thrown, or Emily with hers whatever the case may be. There are 9 chapters and in each one you have the opportunity to go about any way possible to get to the end and either kill the target for that chapter or elsewise eradicate them from their positions. You can play the whole game without killing and you can also attempt to play the whole without being seen if you try hard enough.

                The standout missions are also the most seen in the trailers and other such preview material, the Clockwork Mansion and, the Grand Palace. The Clockwork Mansion is probably the biggest change to the previous game with the Mansion forming and changing shape around you if you or Jindosh. the level’s primary target, pulls a lever. It also marks the return of the only big character from the first game, Anton Sokolov. This level is also notable for introducing the clockwork soldiers. Clockwork soldiers are wooden soldiers with swords for arms who are harder to kill than anything previously in the games. The Grand Palace is notable for having you jump back in forth in time to move around, surpassing guards, locks, and sometimes soldiers.  Both areas are incredibly fun to play.

                On the whole the game is pretty much a more advanced version of the first game. The game pushes its own ideas and does so in a really fun, engaging, and for the most part different way. On the trophy side of things, it has the annoying play the whole game without killing or being seen trophies, but you can try to do those on the lowest difficulty. It is on the short side maybe 10-15 hours, which some can see as a negative, but with two different characters, and three different ways to play through the game there is an endless amount of excitement to be seen. 8.7 out of 10.

               

 

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